About the Artist

History

Though woodworking never left my mind growing up, I put my artistic aspirations on hold while raising my two sons with my high school sweetheart, Vicki. We eventually bought a house that had a small shop in the backyard, and I was able to equip it with enough tools to get me by for small projects and things for the house.  Then in 2015, an event occurred that would change everything for me. An injury at work left me unable to continue at my job, but not injured enough to keep me from the wood shop. I don’t believe in letting life drag you down and I look at my situation as meant to be as it has allowed me to pursue my passion. I was finally able to pursue the type of woodworking I had always dreamed of and had the tools to do it.

 At first, I wasn’t sure what direction I wanted to go in and had so many ideas running through my mind of things I wanted to build that I was like a kid in a candy store (truth be told, I still am). I built jewelry boxes, man boxes, made signs, hope chests, did carvings, made jewelry and dabbled in anything I could think of.

 

It was when I started looking into pyrography (wood burning) that I found my true passion and challenge. I began teaching myself through trial and error how to wood burn. I had a vision in my mind of what it should look like and I kept at it until it did.

A true pyrography artist will tell you that pyrography is not easy. You actually burn into the material you are working with, so you only get one shot at it. To get different shades you use various heat settings (lower heat for lighter shades, higher heat for darker shades).  Any given piece of artwork can take hours, days or even weeks to finish.

I refuse to box myself into any certain genre or direction. I like to keep my options open as I am always coming up with new ideas for designs and projects. My interests are wide ranging and I try to incorporate them into my work whenever I can.  Living in Elgin, OR, a small town nestled between the Blue Mountains and the Eagle Cap Mountains in Northeast Oregon, is a constant source of inspiration. My family and I are all avid outdoor enthusiasts and spend as much time in nature as we can. I am also inspired by Native American cultures (historically important in this corner of the world) which you can see in some of my artwork as well.

History

Though woodworking never left my mind growing up, I put my artistic aspirations on hold while raising my two sons with my high school sweetheart, Vicki. We eventually bought a house that had a small shop in the backyard, and I was able to equip it with enough tools to get me by for small projects and things for the house.  Then in 2015, an event occurred that would change everything for me. An injury at work left me unable to continue at my job, but not injured enough to keep me from the wood shop. I don’t believe in letting life drag you down and I look at my situation as meant to be as it has allowed me to pursue my passion. I was finally able to pursue the type of woodworking I had always dreamed of and had the tools to do it.

 At first, I wasn’t sure what direction I wanted to go in and had so many ideas running through my mind of things I wanted to build that I was like a kid in a candy store (truth be told, I still am). I built jewelry boxes, man boxes, made signs, hope chests, did carvings, made jewelry and dabbled in anything I could think of.

 

It was when I started looking into pyrography (wood burning) that I found my true passion and challenge. I began teaching myself through trial and error how to wood burn. I had a vision in my mind of what it should look like and I kept at it until it did.

A true pyrography artist will tell you that pyrography is not easy. You actually burn into the material you are working with, so you only get one shot at it. To get different shades you use various heat settings (lower heat for lighter shades, higher heat for darker shades).  Any given piece of artwork can take hours, days or even weeks to finish.

I refuse to box myself into any certain genre or direction. I like to keep my options open as I am always coming up with new ideas for designs and projects. My interests are wide ranging and I try to incorporate them into my work whenever I can.  Living in Elgin, OR, a small town nestled between the Blue Mountains and the Eagle Cap Mountains in Northeast Oregon, is a constant source of inspiration. My family and I are all avid outdoor enthusiasts and spend as much time in nature as we can. I am also inspired by Native American cultures (historically important in this corner of the world) which you can see in some of my artwork as well.

Mission

Though I eventually became a pyrography artist and discovered my true passion in wood burning, I still lean on the knowledge I acquired from my father and uncles, particularly my uncle Tony, my mentor and a master wood carver, artist, inventor and house builder.  I’m a third-generation woodworker, a member of a dying breed in this modern age of mass production and computerization. My goal is to keep this artform alive by providing you with a unique, handmade, quality product that you can be proud to display and pass down to the next generation.

 

Process

One of my pet peeves is wood burnings on plywood.  From locally grown or reclaimed to exotic woods, my products are all made with real wood (Blue Pine is my personal favorite). Each piece of wood I use guides the artistic process and helps me to determine the subject matter or type of object that I will burn, carve or build.  I also enjoy crafting pieces from antler, bone and leather.

 From the outset, I knew that I never wanted to replicate my work.  I don’t keep measurements, blue prints or records (other than photos) of any of the pieces I create.  Whether I’m working on a cabin box or pyrography, I’ll make changes to the piece to ensure that it different from any of the others I’ve done.  Each item is a complete original never to be duplicated.

With me, you get a true wood burning (no paint jobs here!). Teaching myself with no outside influence has allowed me to create pieces that are different from other artists, and which I can be proud of and put my name on.

I should also let you know that I am my worst critic when it comes to my work. If I don’t like a piece that I’ve completed, it won’t be put up for sale. I also have the harshest inspector & critic that money can buy, who goes over everything I do with a fine-toothed comb before it goes out the door as well: yep, my wife.

Explore my latest creations currently for sale.

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